Read The Steam Magnate by Dana Copithorne Online

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Departing from formulaic themes involving quests, magicians, and mythical animals, this fantasy novel follows a character with powers more ordinary than most uber-wizards. Having inherited the steam-power legacy and the mysterious ability to funnel the assets of others into his own coffers through the mere use of ink and paper, Eson is hated by some and feared by others. WDeparting from formulaic themes involving quests, magicians, and mythical animals, this fantasy novel follows a character with powers more ordinary than most uber-wizards. Having inherited the steam-power legacy and the mysterious ability to funnel the assets of others into his own coffers through the mere use of ink and paper, Eson is hated by some and feared by others. While recovering from a disastrous relationship with a woman of his own magical kind, he meets a young woman who isn't who she claims to be, and Eson must now defend himself against challenges far too close to home. Set in a world that is a tempting concoction of fairy-tale charm and everyday existence, this work explores the inequities of social class and the realities living among the less fortunate....

Title : The Steam Magnate
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781933083087
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 313 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Steam Magnate Reviews

  • J. Moufawad-Paul
    2018-12-12 09:06

    This beautiful book is the kind of fantasy that prefigures books like *A Stranger in Olondria*: it has the same world-building fantasy feel but in a way where the richness of the world is not used as a basis for epic struggles between armies, or adventurers setting out in a violent land. Not that there aren't "epic struggles" in *The Steam Magnate* but they are of a different order––the banality of capitalist competition, perhaps, that actually means more lives lost and/or impoverished, more states fallen, and more eventual wars than what goes on between tributary social formations. I like to think *The Steam Magnate* as playing an intermediate role in a fantastic tradition that originates with Candas Jane Dorsey's *Black Wine* and has recently culminated in Sofia Samatar's aforementioned "A Stranger in Olondria*. It is a pity that Copithorne has not appeared to continue the story begun in this book despite the fact that it was promised to be part of a larger series.

  • Lora
    2018-11-20 13:22

    I have never read a book like this before. The experience of reading it was much like the experience of looking at a watercolor painting. That's how the characters felt, muted, undefined, but vaguely beautiful. The plot, too, had this quality, such that I don't feel like anything happened, but there was still motion. Just for the unique quality of the prose, I would recommend that people read it. They may not like it, but it will be a new experience.

  • Josie
    2018-11-18 12:21

    This was an interesting read. I still don't feel like I understand what happened or what the motivations of *any* of the characters were, but the language and ideas were intriguing, at least. LOTS of "telling" and very little "showing". If you're okay with that, then go for it. Otherwise, probably steer clear.

  • SFReader
    2018-12-08 07:30

    http://www.sfreader.com/read_review.a...

  • Avril
    2018-11-25 05:12

    This is one of the strangest books I've every read. That being said, I still couldn't put it down.

  • Jennifer
    2018-11-12 11:17

    Nicely written, a lazy read, action unfolds slowly. I'm not sure I ever really get to know Kyra; she is never first person. Might read the sequel when it comes out if the time is right.

  • Jenne
    2018-11-19 13:32

    Not only dull, but also awkwardly written. Which is too bad, because it sounded really interesting, and there were some images that stuck with me. I gave it the Nancy Pearl 50-page try, but nope.