Read Felaheen by Jon Courtenay Grimwood Online

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In a world where secrets kill, an ex-cop discovers he's got the biggest secret of all....Set in a 21st-century Ottoman Empire, Jon Courtenay Grimwood's acclaimed Arabesk series is a noir action-thriller with an exotic twist. Here an ex-cop with nothing to lose finds himself on the trail of a man he doesn't believe in: his father. Ashraf Bey has been a lot of things-and mosIn a world where secrets kill, an ex-cop discovers he's got the biggest secret of all....Set in a 21st-century Ottoman Empire, Jon Courtenay Grimwood's acclaimed Arabesk series is a noir action-thriller with an exotic twist. Here an ex-cop with nothing to lose finds himself on the trail of a man he doesn't believe in: his father. Ashraf Bey has been a lot of things-and most of them illegal. Now, having resigned as El Iskandryia's Chief of Detectives, he's taking stock of his life and there's not much: a mistress he's never made love to, a niece everyone thinks is mentally incompetent, and a credit card bill rising towards infinity. With a revolt breaking out across North Africa, the world seems to be racing Raf straight to hell. The last thing he needs is a father he's never known. But when the old Emir's security chief requests that Raf come out of retirement to investigate an assassination attempt on His Excellency, that's exactly what Raf gets. Now, disguised as an itinerant laborer, Raf goes underground to discover a man-and a past-he never knew...and won't survive again."Fast, furious, fun and elegant, the Arabesk trilogy is one of the best things to hit the bookstores in a while." -SF Revu"Felaheen is SF at its most inventive." -Guardian...

Title : Felaheen
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780553383782
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 357 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Felaheen Reviews

  • Mary Z
    2018-12-01 10:40

    Set in Islamic North Africa, in a world where Germany won the First World War and the Ottoman Empire remains powerful well into the 21st century, “Felaheen” is the third installment of Grimwood’s “Arabesk” trilogy. The story begins right after the events of “Effendi”. Ashraf, Former Chief of Detectives, former Governor of El Iskandriya, possible son of the Emir of Tunis, caretaker to his 11 year old genius niece Hani, living (but not sleeping) with the beautiful and wealthy Zara, finds himself at loose ends. Currently unemployed and still on his journey of self-discovery, he is approached by the director of security for his father the Emir. Eugenie de la Croix tries to enlist his help to protect the Emir from an assassination attempt. Raf goes undercover to discover not only who is behind the planned assassination, but also to obtain proof once and for all as to who he in fact is: the son of Emir Moncef al-Mansur, or the nameless Swedish hiker that his mother maintained fathered him.Leaving a note for his precocious niece, Hani, he leaves her and Zara behind and takes off in pursuit of the truth but Hani tracks him down, putting herself and her cousin, the Emir’s youngest son, in the middle of a civil war.These books, while forming a trilogy, are designed to be stand alone novels as well. As with the other two books, the present day story is interspersed with one from the past. This time, the story of Raf’s mother, Sally. But while these novels do form complete stories of their own, they are best read together as each one builds from the character and story-line development of the previous one. I, for one, am glad that I did read them that way. It took me till well into the second novel to really want these characters to figure certain things out and in “Felaheen,” I was not disappointed. But Grimwood doesn’t spoon feed his readers and one has to actually be engaged in the story in order to understand what’s going on. Fortunately, that’s not hard to do. Grimwood seems to be at ease in the world of his creation and brings us into the sights and sounds and setting till we feel that we are there, right alongside his characters. By showing us the points of view of different characters, the story gets fleshed out in a unique way. I would love to see more books about these characters that I have come to enjoy reading about, especially the relationship between Ashraf and his niece Hani. The relationships in this novel are so complex and layered and difficult. Much like real life.Not at all light reading, but enjoyable and rewarding. I would recommend the series.

  • Bettie☯
    2018-12-04 07:13

    'Dig' said the fox.Ooops - here I am diving in willy-nilly because Connie Willis's time slip is not suiting (can't win 'em all) only to find that this is 3rd in a series about an alternative modern day Tunisia. Sheesh.Like the Gurkas when they unsheath their Khukuris they must draw blood, once a book is swooped upon I must go with it for good or ill (or yawn).NB I've been to Tunisia and loved it - hunted around for Carthage but I must of read the map wrong.LATER - Dut-Doo!

  • Luca Cresta
    2018-11-16 13:35

    Ottima conclusione del trittico Arabesque di quest'autore assai interessante.Prosa eccellente e un intreccio molto interessante, di pari passo ocn l'ambientazione assai particolare.Necessaria la lettura dei precedenti, ma non lascia mai delusi.Le varie storie si amalgamano in modo coerente e la conclusione arriva al momento giusto.Un autore assai interessante di cui proporre sicuramente altre opere.Come sempre un grazie all'ottima traduttrice Chiara Reali.

  • Michele (Mikecas)
    2018-11-19 12:39

    Da:http://www.webalice.it/michele.castel...Terzo e conclusivo capitolo della trilogia Arabesk, di cui avevo già presentato Pashazade ed Effendi. Questa volta, come anche evidenziato dalla quarta di copertina del libro, si torna al filone principale della vicenda, cioè su chi (cosa) sia Ashraf Bey e cosa significhi il suo passato.La trama è abbastanza lineare, anche se con alcune tortuosità, ma magari sono state difficoltà mie a fare le necessarie correlazioni, che lasciano alcuni aspetti non del tutto chiari. Lo stile narrativo ritorna ad essere quello concreto del primo romanzo, ma a me rimane qualche perplessità, come se Grimwood non avesse saputo davvero concludere la vicenda, forse più interessato all'ambientazione che aveva creato che a dare una struttura narrativa solita alla storia che voleva presentare. Lo scontro tra Raf e il suo fratellastro è sia scontato che banale, non riuscendo mai a raggiungere livelli di tensione efficaci, e quindi anche tutte le sottostorie di contorno ne risentono.Mi rendo ben conto di essere probabilmente troppo negativo, perché questo è un romanzo che ho letto con un discreto piacere, ma non posso evitare di far notare un certo senso di disillusione che alla fine mi è rimasto...O forse era stata troppo alta l'aspettativa data dal primo romanzo della trilogia.In ogni caso vale sicuramente la pena di leggerlo, e ogni casa editrice seria dovrebbe sempre concludere le serie che incomincia, vero Mondadori e Rizzoli ? (per non parlare di altri più piccoli), per cui lode a Zona 42.

  • Zaxs Yacs
    2018-11-26 12:22

    In a world where secrets kill, an ex-cop discovers he’s got the biggest secret of all.… Set in a 21st-century Ottoman Empire, Jon Courtenay Grimwood’s acclaimed Arabesk series is a noir action-thriller with an exotic twist. Here an ex-cop with nothing to lose finds himself on the trail of a man he doesn’t believe in: *his father. *Ashraf Bey has been a lot of things–and most of them illegal. Now, having resigned as El Iskandryia’s Chief of Detectives, he’s taking stock of his life and there’s not much: a mistress he’s never made love to, a niece everyone thinks is mentally incompetent, and a credit card bill rising towards infinity. With a revolt breaking out across North Africa, the world seems to be racing Raf straight to hell. The last thing he needs is a father he’s never known. But when the old Emir’s security chief requests that Raf come out of retirement to investigate an assassination attempt on His Excellency, that’s exactly what Raf gets. Now, disguised as an itinerant laborer, Raf goes underground to discover a man–and a past–he never knew…and won’t survive again. “Fast, furious, fun and elegant, the Arabesk trilogy is one of the best things to hit the bookstores in a while.” –SF Revu “Felaheen is SF at its most inventive.” –*Guardian****

  • Mike Franklin
    2018-11-17 07:30

    The third and final book in Grimwood's Arabesk trilogy, continues the story of Ashraf Bey, a reluctant detective in a near future alternate North Africa. This is science fiction meets Raymond Chandler meets alternate history meets a touch of cyberpunk. A strange mix but one I find compelling. However, although still enjoyable, this has proved to be my least favourite of the three; easier to follow but it never quite attains the pace and tension of the others.Grimwood’s writing is, as ever, sharp and gritty and his characters are well drawn though he allowed Zara, a strong character from the previous books, to slide into an unsympathetic and rather whiny minor character in this one which was a shame. However in compensation this time the young Hani is brought forward to prominence and the passages from her perspective were a real joy to read. The cyber aspects of the cyberpunk is much reduced this time around but the punk aspects are still very much in evidence with Grimwood unfailingly capturing the atmosphere of the dirty underbelly of society without actually wallowing in it.A good but not brilliant conclusion to the generally excellent Arabesk trilogy.

  • Ruth
    2018-12-09 08:27

    c2003: FWFTB: 2003: Yes, well. This may be a book that I need to read again in the future to really savour the elegance of the writing. This first read was fairly demented with trying to keep up with the main protagonists movements, the background concerning his mother and how these actions have influenced the future that I am reading about in the very next chapter. Phew. I am not sure that did actually keep up with all the whys and wherefores. I think I understood the ending....but I'm not sure. Perhaps that is what the author was aiming for but it always leaving me a little miffed. I agree with Entertainment Weekly's comments ie 'literary page-turner ' but can't agree with the Guardian's opinion of being 'SF at its most inventive". Any how, recommended to the normal crew that have already embarked on the Arabesk journey. "Their black uniform wasn't one Raf recognised but whatever force they represented it seemed to require them to wear steel-capped eighteen-rivet boots cut from shiny leather. Always a bad sign."

  • Nicholas Whyte
    2018-12-12 07:18

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/155337.html[return][return]The third in Grimwood's Ashraf Bey trilogy, set in an early 21st century North Africa where the Ottoman and German Empires never fell (though Russia is nonetheless soviet) and which is otherwise not very different from our own time-line (to the extent of having the same computer operating systems). Apart from the alternate history aspect, other sf elements include the hero's electronic alter ego and the fact that Tunis is under international sanctions for unauthorised genetic manipulation experiments. I like this series as much for the sultry, sensual prose as for the intricate plot and striking characterisations. This one didn't disappoint. However now that Ashraf Bey has reached a certain point in his political career I hope his creator will move on to other things - as long as they are as enjoyable as this.

  • Fantasy Literature
    2018-12-02 12:39

    In this review, I’m going to write about the willing suspension of disbelief. Perhaps more precisely, I’m writing about the intersection of world-building and the willing suspension of disbelief. Enter Jon Courtenay Grimwood and the ARABESK trilogy: Pashazade, Effendi and Felaheen.In Grimwood’s world, the Ottoman Empire never collapsed. Woodrow Wilson brokered peace between London and Berlin in 1915, World War II never happened, and the major world powers seem to be Germany, France, the USA and the Empire. This alternate timeline stretches a few decades beyond current time, but in terms of fashion and technology, there’s nothing the science fiction reader won’t recognize. It’s the social, political and economic things that are ... Read More:http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  • Lawrence
    2018-11-29 08:29

    As I have come to expect from Grimwood, this was a thrilling read. He jumps from one thread to another quite easily. Or, rather, the author jumps, and the reader easily follows. His usual trick of hiding motivations of the various characters features heavily in this one - maybe a little too heavily for my tastes. In fact, the pieces of the puzzle are left out a little too long, then even at the end don't they still don't fit together quite right.

  • Jason Landau
    2018-11-16 06:41

    Third book in the series. It is set in an alter reality North Africa where the Ottoman and German Empires never fell. Strangely though Russia is nonetheless soviet. A good mystery noir with a bit of cyberpunk (think Neuromancer bio upgrades) thrown in. I shot through the whole series because I thought the premise was great. Sometimes a confusing read because of the multiple story-lines but worth it nonetheless.

  • Joanna
    2018-11-14 10:42

    Great premise--noir cyberpunk alt history!Not so great execution. It just goes ... nowhere.All style and no substance, alas. Though you do find out some of the whys and wherefores in this one. And Hani gets a lot more facetime. She's charming.I hear there might be more Ashraf Bey books in the pipeline ... not sure if I will read them or not.

  • Lauren
    2018-11-29 09:14

    Am 100% willing to say that I did not entirely understand the ending. Also, as with the other two books in the series, too many ellipses.I think maybe I didn't care enough about who Ashraf's parents were to carry me through the series.Better than OK, but not by that much - just not enough there to fully pull me into the story and keep me there.

  • Andy
    2018-11-14 09:42

    This is the ending of the trilogy, though its less engaging or involving than the first two. The ending is rather disapointing and unclear. Still though, worth reading if you have read the previous two.

  • Matty
    2018-12-11 11:38

    The Arabesk trilogy takes you for a suspense mystery joyride with a bit of cyberpunk thrown in for good measure. I wouldn't recommend this books as an intro to Jon Courtenay Grimwood's work, but his fans will definitely get a lot of entertainment out of this cliffhanger. ~mwb

  • xdroot
    2018-11-26 09:31

    the final book in the trilogy made a great ending to the series. you find out about the fox, the motivations of ashraf's mother, and more secrets of ashraf bey. the ending seemed a foregone conclusion, until the author threw in a delicious twist!

  • Dean Simons
    2018-11-18 06:16

    Good story, good conclusion to the trilogy. Many questions answered, some left dangling. The only problem I had was it didn't quite compete with the previous instalments in the trilogy.

  • Neil Pearson
    2018-11-24 06:30

    The weakest of the three, but still a fun alternate future whodunnit. Plus we get a bit more on the history of who and what ashraf is.

  • Pioden
    2018-12-05 13:29

    Third Arabesk

  • Bennie
    2018-12-03 07:34

    This time the case is personal. An anticlimactic end to the Arabesk trilogy. Will probably be a better read the second time through.

  • Dana
    2018-12-04 05:23

    Great series Must read again

  • Doug
    2018-11-13 05:31

    Noir Arabian cyberpunk. Very enjoyable purely for that!

  • Annalisa Carr
    2018-11-12 09:22

    I loved this book. Great thriller with a splash of weird. Amazon describes it as cyberpunk????

  • Jessica
    2018-11-24 08:25

    fluffy read.

  • Tal
    2018-11-13 13:25

    i must admit i struggled with this book - too many characters that were too flat and whose names i couldnt distinguish, a plot that didnt feel like anything happened... i just didnt get it.