Read L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century: A Dystopian Tale of Consumerism, Corporate Coffee, and Crowbars by Jason R. Richter Online

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In 23rd Century America, the war on terror has escalated to the point where every car accident, every error at work, every purchase of non-commemorative memorabilia is considered a terrorist act, until Pat McGewan-X04 and a band of patriots turned terrorists decide to stop the fear mongering news media once and for all.Pat McGewan-X04 is a patriotic cubicle production techIn 23rd Century America, the war on terror has escalated to the point where every car accident, every error at work, every purchase of non-commemorative memorabilia is considered a terrorist act, until Pat McGewan-X04 and a band of patriots turned terrorists decide to stop the fear mongering news media once and for all.Pat McGewan-X04 is a patriotic cubicle production technician that is involved in a freak one-car accident after work one day. The media skews the story until he is the heroic sole survivor of this week's most vicious terrorist attack on American soil. The news coverage piques the interest of two very different people, Herb, America's last librarian and Jack Flanery, America's most watched, most vitriolic talking head. Herb claims that Pat is the Chosen One, destined to lead his small band of "terrorists" in the coming revolution and make Americans lose their fear of the media's manufactured terrorist threats. Jack Flanery has an old grudge against Pat and paints him as the most dangerous domestic terrorist in the history of the two hundred year War on Terror. Pat must choose between what he is told is a Patriot's Duty and be executed or become one of Herb's "terrorists" and redefine what Patriotism truly is.L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century is a sometimes absurd look into the fear, the paranoia, the relinquishment of civil liberties in the name of security that Americans deal with today. This is the worst-case scenarios from today's War on Terror played out over the next two hundred years....

Title : L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century: A Dystopian Tale of Consumerism, Corporate Coffee, and Crowbars
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780997884111
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 182 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century: A Dystopian Tale of Consumerism, Corporate Coffee, and Crowbars Reviews

  • Stephanie
    2018-11-23 10:55

    Set in a futuristic world where even the smallest mistake or misunderstanding can lead to a person receiving the label of terrorist, L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century by Jason R. Richter tells a tale of American culture in extremes. The story follows P. McGewan-X04, whose life is progressing normally in a very consumer-driven and patriotism centric world when suddenly an engineering mistake accidentally causes a forty-ton container to fall from an airship onto his car as he is driving home. The event is quickly determined to be an act of terror and the man in charge of loading the airship is promptly executed. Upon awakening, P. McGewan's life quickly changes as he slowly becomes aware of what is truly happening in the world around him.I was pleasantly surprised by this book. L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century was intriguing from the start. The dystopian and futuristic setting in which the main character resides is an impressive imagining of consumerism in an extreme that eerily captures the dangers of the very similar preoccupation that exists in America today. The Government uses patriotism to control the masses, pushing the idea that it is linked irreversibly with the constant purchasing of goods. The population is regularly brainwashed into compliance with threats of terrorist attacks and the idea that anyone making mistakes or showing a lack of support for the country is a terrorist themselves.There was a lot to like about Richter's novel. I was pulled right into the story and the premise brilliantly managed to make me truly think about the message the author was trying to send. I found myself enjoying every aspect of the novel as I read it, eagerly devouring each page. The plot was very imaginative and well executed which only made me love it all the more. Richter built a beautifully terrifying world for his readers that I even felt myself missing once I'd finished reading.Best of all, Richter's characters were clever and interesting. Not only did they seem very real, but I felt genuinely invested in their lives and futures. They were all quite unique and I adored the main character, P. McGewan-X04, who was often portrayed as honorable and intelligent. He was abrasive on occasion, but I found the brashness had an endearing quality to it when paired with the rest of his personality.The only disappointment I experienced while reading this book came when I read the epilogue. While I found it entertaining at first as it gave me an opportunity to see where the characters were after all they'd been through, the epilogue felt extremely out of place. It didn't seem to match the rest of the book at all and there was nothing to lead readers into the odd plot twist. It ultimately felt unnecessary, out of the blue, and confusing. I truly believe Richter's book would be much better without it.At the end of the day, I really loved L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century. Despite the strange epilogue, I found Richter to be a masterful writer and storyteller. I think L.I.F.E. in the 23rd Century could appeal to a great number of people, particularly adults who enjoy dystopian and science fiction novels. I'm glad that I had the chance to read it.I read this book for OnlineBookClub reviews.🌟🌟🌟🌟| Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Book Club Reviews |

  • Rick Heinz
    2018-11-22 09:58

    Everything you need to know about this book is summed up in this tagline: "Pat McGewan - X04 - is a patriotic cubicle technician..." Just the dry witty humor in that line alone oozes through the book.In a way, the book is a political parody of our culture taken to the extreme today, and its both funny and scary to read chapters, only to turn on some talking head on TV today and see how close they are to forced patriotism. I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes sarcastic and dark reflections with political under (and over, and through, and with a crowbar) overtones.

  • Eric Landreneau
    2018-11-21 07:57

    A good, fast, gripping read, and a harsh warning dressed up as a comedy in the finest absurdist tradition. Without the buffering jokes, the disheartening reality of the world in this book would hit way too close to the life we live in. It would feel like a tale of tomorrow, not of 200 years in the future. And that's the point. Comedy functions to package awful concepts in palatable forms. You laugh and say "That's so true!" But you keep on thinking about the idea, the concept, the warning. And you stop laughing. That is where this book fits; it its credit, and our detriment, L.I.F.E. is more of a mirror than it initially seems to be.

  • Jason R Richter
    2018-12-05 02:44