Read The Pilgrim's Staff by Peter Clothier Online

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“I am no Rake,” protests the anonymous English gentleman whose two hundred year-old journal falls into the hands of the prominent Los Angeles-based figure painter and avid blogger, David Soames… … who is skeptical of the author’s protestation. “No Rake…?” Blog and journal soon begin to mirror each other in an exchange that echoes across the centuries. As the potboiler romp“I am no Rake,” protests the anonymous English gentleman whose two hundred year-old journal falls into the hands of the prominent Los Angeles-based figure painter and avid blogger, David Soames… … who is skeptical of the author’s protestation. “No Rake…?” Blog and journal soon begin to mirror each other in an exchange that echoes across the centuries. As the potboiler romps exuberantly through 18th century Georgian boudoirs, it triggers the intimate memories of a 21st century man reflecting on youth—and age.The more things change, it seems, the more they stay the same. At least when it comes to men and sex. The Pilgrim’s Staff is an explicit, unabashed reflection on the nature of masculine sexuality…...

Title : The Pilgrim's Staff
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781502527
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 391 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Pilgrim's Staff Reviews

  • Gregg Chadwick
    2019-06-14 20:47

    Peter Clothier's scurrilously witty new novel "The Pilgrim's Staff" explores lust, lecherousness, and love through the voices of two men from two disparate centuries. David Soames, a contemporary figurative painter living as an ex-pat in Los Angeles, receives a curious package in the mail from an English cousin. Wrapped in layers of tape and memory is the two hundred year-old journal of an English gentleman, who begins his tale with the words,"I am no Rake!" "Rake" is a wonderfully antiquated word that refers to a man caught in the snares of immorality, particularly concerning the charms of the opposite sex. Writing this on the 10th of November, in a coincidence worthy of Clothier's novel, I am reminded that the 18th century English painter William Hogarth was born on this day in 1697. Hogarth's pre-cinematic series entitled "A Rake's Progress" immediately comes to mind. Reflecting his own deep history in the arts as both writer and arts administrator, Clothier deftly weaves artistic concerns into "The Pilgrim's Staff." In Clothier's novel both men richly voice their own sexual histories with honesty and quite a bit of humor that echoes the satirical artworks of fellow Englishmen Hogarth, Thomas Rowlandson, and George Cruikshank.Clothier's "The Pilgrim's Staff" is not a mere romp. The novel also explores the destructive potential of family legacy and the clouded history of power, abuse, and sexual slavery in 18th century Imperial England as well as in our contemporary world. "The Pilgrim's Staff" is a book about sexual pleasure and also a cautionary tale that reminds us not to lose the love as we lust. Highly recommended!

  • Linda Diaz
    2019-06-03 16:48

    This book is a revelation inside the minds of two men on intimacy and romance from different centuries. I thoroughly enjoyed the back and forth between David, a writer in our modern era, and Laurence, from the 18th century. Laurence hid the book in his house in the hopes that it would never be discovered. England during the 18th century was not a time of great tolerance. Therefore, Laurence understood that it was not the right time for his book to be revealed to all. About two centuries later, it is David who will read Laurence’s book and makes it is his mission to transcribe it for all to finally read. Transcribing Laurence’s book causes David to reflect on his own past and present. Throughout this journey, I was able to explore the feelings, thoughts, and emotions of men, which is often hidden in society.What both David and Laurence have in common is their troubled relationships with their fathers and women. We are able to enter both men’s lives as they mature from boys to gown men. They learn to navigate relationships with women, and crave to love and be loved. Laurence was never able to have a good relationship with his father. The hypocrisy of a father who makes his son fear him based on lies is no real man. But we do witness an evolution through the centuries as David is able to have a better relationship with his own father. David also expresses how he wants his sons and grandsons to go to him with their own feelings, thoughts, and emotions. It is through honesty and respect that boys grow up to be good fathers and husbands. The cycle of silence among men is meant to be broken!I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  • Katie
    2019-06-22 14:37

    In The Pilgrim’s Staff, David, a painter and blogger, becomes in possession of an old journal that chronicles the exploits and musings of an 18th century rake. David begins transcribing the journal and sharing it in his blog, while finding similarities and insight into his own life, while being engaged and entertained by ‘Laurence’s’ stories. I was impressed by the author’s ability to bring to life the 18th century young man's life, he really does a great job of using language and detail. The journal entries seem real, even in their outrageousness. This is an entertaining look at men’s lives, and how the same pursuits and pitfalls of the past apply to today. I really liked how the two stories were so well integrated, it kept things fresh throughout the book. I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  • Deborah Kilduff
    2019-06-03 17:55

    The Pilgrim’s Staff is written as a story within a story. The author uses the discovery of an old manuscript to tell the story of David, an artist and active blogger and the parallel story of Laurence, who lived 200 years before. This technique of switching between the present and the past could be confusing, but the author did a good job of unraveling both characters’ stories. The subject matter could have been quite crass, but the author did an admirable job of keeping it from being pornographic. The sexually explicit scenes, of which there were many, were written with taste. Although the subject matter was not something I would normally choose, I found it an interesting study. Those who enjoy erotic literature should appreciate this well-written book.I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  • Betty Yoder
    2019-06-11 13:54

    18th century and today! Comparing two centuries make for a very interesting dissertation of the sexual prowess of the male (and female) of years gone by and now. The love in both the 18th Century with Laurence and Elspeth of the love found with the modern-day artist, David, underlines that lust isn't all there is. This book is not just a "romp in the hay", but the discovery of the men themselves. Written very well by Peter Clothier with humor and honesty, and a believable story edges the reader to continue to read on. Mr. Clothier does a wonderful job with the many old world consequences of illicit sex and his use of the Old English language is worth the time to read it!I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.