Read Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai by Masaaki Hatsumi Online

unarmed-fighting-techniques-of-the-samurai

In Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai, world-renowned ninja grandmaster and bestselling author Masaaki Hatsumi explains the fundamentals of various unarmed techniques unique to the Japanese martial arts. Known as budo taijutsu, these specialized moves allow the practitioner to evade and receive an attack even from an opponent wielding a sword. Hatsumi covers such tIn Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai, world-renowned ninja grandmaster and bestselling author Masaaki Hatsumi explains the fundamentals of various unarmed techniques unique to the Japanese martial arts. Known as budo taijutsu, these specialized moves allow the practitioner to evade and receive an attack even from an opponent wielding a sword. Hatsumi covers such topics as Kihon Happo (Eight Basic Movements), Kosshijutsu (Attacks Against Muscles), Koppojutsu (Attacks Against Bones), Jutaijutsu (Flexible Body Arts), Daken Taijutsu (Fist Punching and Striking), Ninpo Taijutsu (Bodily Arts of the Ninja), discussing and demonstrating the many techniques which will enable the fighter to punch, kick and finally lock or control the body of his adversary.As Hatsumi tells us, the techniques have been secretly passed down from the masters to their students for more than a century, and have become the foundations for a range of other martial arts including judo, karate and aikido. This book will thus enhance the readers understanding of the roots of these various disciplines as well as provide fascinating insights into the spirit of the way of the warrior and the martial arts. Includes over 300 step-by-step photos and rare drawings....

Title : Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9784770030597
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 239 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Unarmed Fighting Techniques of the Samurai Reviews

  • Nathan Orgill
    2018-10-13 12:18

    Ahh, the Bible of the Martial Artist, and it lives up to that name. There are so many stories and well-photographed techniques that it makes the book invaluable to a true martial artist. Most of the Original scrolls translated and paired with real pictures... awesome.

  • Luke Crocker
    2018-10-04 11:14

    A collection of six of the nine traditions taught within the Bujinkan organization, Masaaki Hatsumi lists most of the unarmed fighting kata found there of. The traditions include Gyokko-ryu Kosshijutsu, Koto-ryu Koppojutsu, Togakure-ryu Ninpo Taijutsu, Takagi Yoshin-ryu Jutaijutsu, Kukishinden-ryu Dakentaijutsu, and Shinden Fudo-ryu Dakentaijutsu.My own copy of this has been worn out until it is difficult to pull off the shelf without it it falling apart.

  • Travis
    2018-09-23 10:03

    Another excellent book by the current Grandmaster of Ninjutsu. Hatsumi provides pictures and translations of original scrolls (many dating back hundreds of years to near a thousand years old) that detail all of the techniques and mental aspects of Ninjutsu, the "Samurai" arts and life. Included are full page diagrams and photos of some of the physical techniques that are discussed that are of much use to those familiar with some of the techniques.Hatsumi speaks mountains in a single sentence throughout this book, saying more than most people do in thousand page novels. One must read these words at varying stages of life to fully understand their meaning as this humble reader most certainly didn't grasp the full context of his stories and thoughts. Far more than just martial arts techniques are outlined here, truly a master work on Budo "the warrior path" which encompasses every aspect of ones life beyond fighting. Of interesting note are some photos of his instructor, the 33rd grandmaster of Ninjutsu, Toshitsugu Takamatsu, that I'm not certain have ever been released before.

  • Bernie Gourley
    2018-10-01 12:06

    This is an incredibly useful resource for those who study Takamatsu-den martial arts. It is organized by school, and gives descriptions of each technique. These descriptions are cryptic densho-esque descriptions, and so would not really be of much use to anyone who had not been taught the techniques. If you don't study in one of these organizations that came from either Hatsumi (Bujinkan), Hatsumi's students (Jinenkan, Gembukan, etc.), or Hatsumi's student's students, I don't know that the book would be of much value to you. Having said that, each chapter begins with more generic comments. Also, this book has some outstanding graphics in terms of photos, reprinted drawings, etc. And there are not all the blurry photos that somehow made their way into other recent Hatsumi Kodansha volumes.