Read Courier from Warsaw by Jan Nowak Online

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The author describes his experiences as a member of the Polish underground during World War II and his efforts to gain the support of the Allied leaders. Jan Nowak-Jezioranski (1914-2005) was a Polish journalist, writer, politician, social worker and patriot. He served during the Second World War as one of the most notable resistance fighters of the Home Army. He is best rThe author describes his experiences as a member of the Polish underground during World War II and his efforts to gain the support of the Allied leaders. Jan Nowak-Jezioranski (1914-2005) was a Polish journalist, writer, politician, social worker and patriot. He served during the Second World War as one of the most notable resistance fighters of the Home Army. He is best remembered for his work as an emissary shuttling between the commanders of the Home Army and the Polish Government in Exile in London and other Allied governments which gained him the nickname "Courier from Warsaw", and for his participation in the Warsaw Uprising. After the war he worked as the head of the Polish section of Radio Free Europe, and later as a security advisor to the US presidents Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter....

Title : Courier from Warsaw
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780814317259
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 477 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Courier from Warsaw Reviews

  • Czarny Pies
    2018-10-20 09:22

    You can read Courier from Warsaw in two ways. First it is an extremely well written memoire of a senior operative in the Polish Home Army (AK) that fought a fierce war against the Germans during World War II, culminating in the Warsaw Uprising of 1944 in which 20,000 German soldiers were killed. At the same time, Courier from Warsaw is an invaluable source from a high-place member of the Polish resistance who made regular clandestine visits to London to brief the British and negotiate for aid.Only one of Nowak's conclusions has not stood up well as new material has been released from the British archives. Nowak attributes the fact that more aid was not forthcoming to the Poles in part to his own failings as a diplomat noting that there appeared to be anti-Polish factions in the British foreign office. Norman Davies Warsaw Uprising has shown that there were in fact no pro-Polish voices in the Foreign office which was to a man actively hostile to the Polish cause. The career Foreign Office members had distrusted Poland from its inception to 1919 which they suspected of pro-German sympathies. They were highly sympathetic to the Russian government in-exile hoping that the Tsar would eventually be restored and that his Polish territories would be returned to him. They became furious with the Poles whose refusal to compromise on Danzig as the Czechs had compromised on the Sudetenland had forced Britain to war. Winston Churchill had profound pro-Polish feelings but simply was unable on his own to overcome the all pervasive hostility to Poland in the Foreign Office.It is possible of course that Nowak is a disingenuous author. After the War, Nowak spent his entire working career employed at RadioFree Europe and the Polish service of the BBC. It is possible that he simply saw no use in antagonizing people whose support he stilled wished to secure.This a great book for WWII buffs and anyone interested specifically in the Warsaw Uprising.