Read Nappy Hair by Carolivia Herron Joe Cepeda Online

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Now in Dragonfly: a lively, empowering story about Brenda's knotted-up, twisted, nappy hair and how it got to be that way! Told in the African-American "call and response" tradition, this story leaps off the page, along with vibrant illustrations by Joe Cepeda.Winner of a Parenting Reading Magic Award...

Title : Nappy Hair
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780679894452
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 32 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Nappy Hair Reviews

  • Jim Erekson
    2018-11-16 02:30

    This book was a fun experience! (I'll have to compare to the other three picturebooks on this theme.) The voice of the grandpa reminded me so much of my own grandpa, who also loved to push a joke. I thought the call/response storytelling was so fresh and unique, and the way fonts were used to represent different voices responding was perfect. I loved how some of the voices were protecting the little girl, and how the grandpa responded by repairing and nurturing her. I found myself worrying whether her feelings would be hurt, and then the conversation would shift to something that built her up. Since she tells us the text comes from an audio recording, I wonder how true the text is to that recording. I also wonder if she appreciated this kind of attention at the time, or if she did find it embarrassing. I would read another book by Herron in this style in a heartbeat! The story of the neighborhood mob that drummed a white teacher out of a Brooklyn school (because she helped the kids learn to enjoy reading through this book) is heartbreaking. You can find it on page 58 of Foerstel's book on bannings in the US.

  • Jasmine
    2018-11-09 22:25

    I recall being a little kid and wanting the straight pretty hair of the girls I saw on tv...not the black/mexican curly/wavy coif i was born with. It wasn't a life altering book for the 12 year old me, but still, i liked it.

  • Mehsi
    2018-11-05 21:05

    It is Banned Books Week, and I am reading Challenged/Banned books. This is the ninth and last book for this week.This book was banned (and even more happened) because it was considered racially insensitive. This book is about a girl and her amazing (yes, I have to say amazing) hair. Though well, amazing, it isn't so amazing for the girl. Trying to tame it is impossible. Brushing? Don't even try that. It is told by the uncle, and it tells us how the girl got her nappy hair. From God to angels to Africa. It was a pretty fun way to tell us the story about the Nappy Hair. That it was intended to be her hair. I really liked it, I am sure the girl still has her problems with her hair, but she may feel better about having it.I watched this one on Youtube, and I love the narrator on there. She really has a way of bringing the story to life. The art of the book is pretty OK-ish. Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/

  • Willie Butts
    2018-10-23 22:21

    21. Herron, Carolivia. Nappy Hair. New York: Dragonfly Books, 1997.Genre: FictionNappy Hair is a picture book that is full of African origins, God’s intent, and pride in one’s self. It tells a very interesting story about a little girl named Brenda who has knotted-up, twisted, nappy hair and how her hair got that way. Throughout the story the family takes pleasure in making fun describing her hair and at the same time discovering the beauty and meaning of it. The method of multi-voice dialogue displayed in different kinds of styles, sizes, and the musical tone to the book gives it a certain ethnic feeling. The colors that are used are youthful and bold which provide plenty of appeal for children. Using “call and response” the African American method of story telling reminds me of sitting in church service and hearing the voices of members from the congregation affirming the pastor’s message as he preaches. By using this method it helps the attended audience make a personal connection to the story. In a very subtle way this picture book also addresses other issues that people struggle with such as self-pride.

  • Chanel
    2018-10-24 03:25

    Nappy Hair by Carolivia Herron, in my opinion, was not a great book. Although the plot gIves students something to think about and question, I do not think it is very appropriate. The story does not really have a problem and solution, instead it is just Brenda's uncle preaching about how nappy her hair is. Even though I really didn't enjoy reading this book, the illustrations by Joe Cepeda were very nice. While reading this book, I do not think children wow be exposed to a variety of perspectives. I also think some of the references about Brenda's hair can be offensive to African American females with natural hair. I personally think the word nappy is kind of derogatory and puts a negative stereotype on individuals who identify with the natural hair community. The speech the characters use depicts the speech one would typically hear in the African American community. Furthermore, the author nor illustrator is not a member of the group presented, which explains the negative sterotypes.

  • Laila Brown
    2018-10-21 02:26

    The story “Nappy Hair” by Carolivia focuses on a young African American girl Brenda who has “Nappy Hair”. The story is told in a storytelling fashion that dates back to the 1800’s when African Americans were slaves. In the story Brenda’s Uncle describes and compares her hair to many natural things like the desert and the snow. Brenda’s Uncle helps to ensure that Brenda feels proud and beautiful for she is the only girl in the world who has hair as beautiful as hers. One of the most present colors in the book “Nappy Hair” is the color red. Not only is red the prominent color on the cover of the book, but it also a prominent color throughout the entire story. In this story the color red represents power; the power Brenda has because of her unique hair, heritage, and culture. The story “Nappy Hair” centers around Brenda and her “nappy” hair. In order to show that Brenda has nappy hair, texture must be used. The texture of Brenda’s hair aids readers into viewing Brenda’s hair type as something that a lot of African Americans do have in reality. Regarding stereotypes within the illustrations of the story “Nappy Hair”, there is none. In actuality the illustrations within the book depict many different looking African Americans who have different clothing, hair, and even personality types. There is no tokenism present within the story either, the African American characters look African American instead of characters who look Caucasian with African American features. In “Nappy Hair” there isn't a problem present but rather there is a sense of happiness and celebration of natural beauty and culture. Finally there are no Caucasians present within this story which means that the African Americans hold all of the power and take a hold of all the leadership positions within the story. This helps young African American students in classrooms who little examples presented to them where African Americans hold powerful positions.

  • Takee Jobe
    2018-11-19 00:26

    I stumbled across an article about a New York teacher who read the book Nappy Hair to her 3rd grade students; only to be threatened and chastised by parents causing her to eventually transfer to another school district. The book that caused so much controversy piqued my curiosity and led me to purchase a copy to read for myself. I chose to purchase the book and not borrow it from the library because as an African American woman, I was sure it would be a book that would probably resonate with me, and also one that I would like to add to my personal collection to share (especially if I one day was blessed wo have a daughter). Nappy Hair is a nonfiction children’s book written for children ages 4-10. The story is hilariously narrated through the eyes of Uncle Mordecai and it reminded of the story telling African Americans are known for, dating back centuries. The illustrations are bold and the I enjoyed the different fonts used express the varying dialect in the book. I must admit, I too had a negative perception of “nappy hair” (most African American women will renounce their hair as being labeled “nappy”) but this book shows having nappy hair as a beautiful gift from God and should be celebrated. The book shows an accurate and fair depiction of African American culture and I would highly recommend it for ANY girl, not just those who are a minority.

  • Rekesha
    2018-10-23 19:21

    Nappy Hair was a good read. It is about a little young black girl with nappy, curly hair. As I was reading it felt like in the beginning her family wasn't supportive of her nappy hair. As I kept reading her family became more supportive. They started explaining the history of her hair. I really appreciated that part because, my mother and grandmother actually did this to me. I think that if more parents and families explain to children their family history it would only strengthen the child. I say this because, once I found out about my families history and where our hair and skin color came from I felt proud to know that I am carrying on something that has been passed down for years. It makes one want to stay true to their roots. I would read this book to my younger cousins and explain to them our roots and how it is important to respect and appreciate what our ancestors gave us.

  • Daniel Sheehan
    2018-11-11 03:17

    This book is about a young girl learning about her curly hair and how her hair became this way. Learning from families members about how she is the way she is her grandpa is a huge aspect with her learning. He describes past relatives and their hair styles and how not one persons is the same. She learns her hair is not gonna change and she has to live with it. This book with the illustrations showed no stereotypes as the characters showed different aspects from person to person. They did not share any of the exact same traits but portrayed everyone as different people. Within the story line White people were referenced in aspects of taking Africans from Africa and taking them to the states. The lifestyle seemed to be a middle class neighbor hood with very nice house and landscaped yards.

  • Joshua Krieger
    2018-11-05 19:29

    Herron, C., & Cepeda, J. (1999). Nappy hair. New York: Dragonfly Books.

  • Cat
    2018-11-16 22:18

    I love this story! Best ever for group reading! Lots of different voices. Very empowering book. Illustrations are wonderful.

  • Kourtney
    2018-10-28 19:13

    The genre of this book is informational. I loved this book! It took it's readers all the way back to the history of the black race and explained the origin behind their hair type. The main character is intrigued by her hair pattern and wants to learn more. She begins learning from families members about why her hair is the way it is. Her grandpa is very influential in this discovery of herself and her background and he plays a huge role in her learning. He describes past relatives and their roots and expands upon the uniqueness of the black race. She learns her hair is not gonna change and she has to embrace it.This book with the illustrations showed no stereotypes as the characters showed uniqueness through each person. They did not share any of the exact same traits but portrayed everyone as different people. Within the plot Caucasian persons were referenced in aspects of taking Africans from Africa and taking them to the states. This is factual information and letting kids know the history without feeling the need to cover it up or be ashamed of it. The illustrations are vibrant and detailed.

  • Greg
    2018-10-23 03:28

    Carolivia Herron tells us the tales of a young girl, Brenda, and her nappy hair. The focus of this story is about the deep African-American roots that are embedded in each strand of Brenda's hair. When I first saw the cover I was taken back by the use of the word "nappy". I was surprised that nappy was used in a positive way. I thought that no one would ever want their hair to be considered nappy. But after reading the story, it was very easy to see how nappy hair is a p...moreCarolivia Herron tells us the tales of a young girl, Brenda, and her nappy hair. The focus of this story is about the deep African-American roots that are embedded in each strand of Brenda's hair. When I first saw the cover I was taken back by the use of the word "nappy". I was surprised that nappy was used in a positive way. I thought that no one would ever want their hair to be considered nappy. But after reading the story, it was very easy to see how nappy hair is a positive character trait when it is traced back to its roots. When teaching this book to a class I would want to ask the children if they have any traits in their family that appear generation after generation. I would want to make sure that children can relate to Brenda's hair by looking at the way freckles, curly hair, noses, body size, or any other physical feature appears in a student's family tree. All of these special features need to be celebrated. Another thing that I love about this story is the way it is told. As Uncle Mordecai tells the family about Brenda's nappy hair, you hear other family members interjecting throughout his story. This would be a great read aloud story as the regional dialect and interjections by the family may be difficult for younger readers. Joe Cepeda does a fantastic job with illustrations. As Uncle Mordecai tells this story you can see in Brenda's eyes that she is very eager to hear the story and very proud of her nappy hair.

  • Terri Lynn
    2018-11-15 03:20

    I had heard about the controversy over this book for a long time and have just finally gotten around to reading it. I am left wondering why all the controversy. A lovely little girl Brenda has the curliest and nappiest hair and she learns that this is a wonderful thing to be proud of. I am white with hair that is NOT the curliest and always wanted curls. When I was growing up in Atlanta in the 1960's/1970's, I had many black friends. We girls, black and white, used to love to get together and play beauty shop. Naturally in a beauty shop working with hair is the main thing (along with facials and doing nails) so we all did one another's hair. I marveled at wonders of nappy hair then and enjoyed feeling of it and being shown by my black friends how to work with it and fix it up just as they enjoyed working with my down-to-the-ass red/brown hair. We had so much fun and in those days, black men and women were learning to take a lot of pride in their looks. Black was and still is quite beautiful. I always have enjoyed the rainbow of people on this earth and the different looks and cultures and in our innocence, we young girls learned to accept, work with and even love what we were born with. I am going to share this book with the homeschooled kids I work with. There is such an innocence in children. Each baby enters the world as an atheist (no matter what the parents believe) who has no prejudice or hatred against any other group until this is taught to them. Prejudice, bigotry, racism, sexism, and homophobia do not come naturally. I think that this book, though it has references to a god making the girl have her beautiful nappy hair, shows that nappy hair is cool, it is beautiful, it is something to be celebrated. And that is a good lesson to learn at any age.

  • Amairani Medina
    2018-11-08 23:20

    Review of Controversial BookAfter reading about teacher Ruth Sherman being transferred from her school in Brooklyn to Queens because of reading this book to her third-graders, I wondered what could possibly have been written in this story that would have caused enough uproar to make her leave the school. Well, naturally I had to look for the book and read it to understand.This story is told by the author herself, through the eyes of Uncle Mordecai in an attempt to have people celebrate the differences that exist among different races and ethnicities. It is written in a call and response format, which I deeply appreciated because it made the story all the more authentic. The illustrations carried the story so well with their vividness and beauty. The family in the story is at a picnic and everyone interjects when they talk about Brenda's hair being "nappy." There is some teasing, but overall the book has a positive energy because of the pride that Brenda has in her hair and that translates into the pride that people have for their culture. I can see where some people would be concerned about stereotypical references, especially in the negative connotation that exists with the word "nappy." However, I find this story to be a lot more open about a culture and because the author is telling her own story, the fact that it is being challenged makes it seem as though she has to ask for validation from different groups, one being parents. She shouldn't have to ask for approval because it is her own story that she is telling. Unfortunately, there are too many books like this one that face the same problem.

  • Imee Ona
    2018-11-13 03:16

    Banned Book #2Nappy Hair by Carolivia Herron is full of charm and beauty. It is empowering in a subtle way. And I think it would be empowering to every little girl, not just black girls. The story focuses on Uncle Mordecai's story of how Brenda got her "nappy hair" and why it is beautiful. The story has a strong representation of voice and culture - the importance of family structure, community and having a strong sense of racial/cultural pride. You feel as if you are right in front of Uncle Mordecai and can feel his pride and love for his family. You also get a strong sense of love from the other members of Brenda's family as you an hear the comments and praises from them in the background. It makes you feel like you're there! I think this book can be used anywhere from primary to secondary levels. I could see this story being used in a unit focused on identity and celebrating differences. It addresses stereotypes, gives a history connection to Africa and slavery, and addresses images and standards of beauty. Some of these topics can be touched on or delved into based on students' levels.In the end, I think it is a beautiful book about celebrating our unique selves and connecting who we are with our racial and cultural background. It was challenged for being considered racially insensitive, but I think that would only happen if the reader isn't given the proper context for the story (i.e. historical background, purpose for reader/writer). I could also see a challenge in reading the multiple voices in the story, but that can be remedied with a read aloud focused inflection and prosody.

  • Greg
    2018-10-28 03:14

    Carolivia Herron tells us the tales of a young girl, Brenda, and her nappy hair. The focus of this story is about the deep African-American roots that are embedded in each strand of Brenda's hair.When I first saw the cover I was taken back by the use of the word "nappy". I was surprised that nappy was used in a positive way. I thought that no one would ever want their hair to be considered nappy. But after reading the story, it was very easy to see how nappy hair is a positive character trait when it is traced back to its roots. When teaching this book to a class I would want to ask the children if they have any traits in their family that appear generation after generation. I would want to make sure that children can relate to Brenda's hair by looking at the way freckles, curly hair, noses, body size, or any other physical feature appears in a student's family tree. All of these special features need to be celebrated.Another thing that I love about this story is the way it is told. As Uncle Mordecai tells the family about Brenda's nappy hair, you hear other family members interjecting throughout his story. This would be a great read aloud story as the regional dialect and interjections by the family may be difficult for younger readers.Joe Cepeda does a fantastic job with illustrations. As Uncle Mordecai tells this story you can see in Brenda's eyes that she is very eager to hear the story and very proud of her nappy hair.

  • Ashleigh Pollard
    2018-11-05 02:23

    I loooovved this book!! The story is about a girl who has "nappy hair" which is stated by her Grandfather throughout the entire story. Many might find this book to be controversial because of the mentioning of African American slaves and the word "nappy" but the overall merit of the book is brilliant and relatable by all girls who struggle to accept the way they were made! the book describes her hair being difficult to comb because it seems to have a mind of its own. However, grandpa states that she needs to learn how to own that beautiful nappy hair of hers and to not be ashamed because her giant curls are beautiful. The way the story is written is absolutely hilarious because the speech, rhythm, and tone gives the book personality, and keeps the reader engaged. The pictures aren't the most appealing illustrations I have seen in a children's book, but the text sure does outshines them. If any girl is ever feeling down about herself, no matter what age, race, or background I guarantee that this story will put a grin on her face! My favorite quote that made me laugh out loud was. "God wanted hisself some nappy hair upon the face of the Earth." Meaning, if God gave it to you then its beautiful, so own it, and learn to love what you have!

  • Taylor Durant
    2018-11-03 23:24

    This story tells about a little girl with extremely nappy hair told from her uncle's perspective. Uncle Mordecai sits back during a picnic and tells all about Brenda's nappy hair. The story is call and response, so if a student is reading it by them self, it may be a little difficult to understand what is going on in the beginning, but if a teacher is reading it aloud, then the students have a better chance of making sense of the text. It would be difficult to use this narrative as a teacher only because when teaching students who have not yet matured, some of the language in the book could be used to make fun of other students who have the same type of hair, but the overall point of the story is to make the girl feel empowered about her one of a kind hair. In my classroom, I could read the story aloud to teach the children about how hair can be naturally nappy, and I can explain the language used so it is not seen as offensive. The author, Carolivia Herron, is an African American, so she probably drew from her own experiences when writing this story. The illustrator, Joe Cepeda did a fantastic job bringing this story to life. Each illustration fits perfectly with what is being said on the page.

  • Meg
    2018-10-31 00:28

    I loved this one. Nappy Hair is a grandfather telling the story of his granddaughter's nappy hair. It celebrates her curls and the history of her hair. It's unapologetically black, but it obviously crosses cultures, as this curly haired adult saw herself if the granddaughter.Edit: A few weeks later, having discussed this book in my multicultural lit class, I feel the need to share the controversy surrounding this book. A white teacher faced backlash for reading this book to her class, as it uses the derogatory term, nappy hair. When discussing whether this book should be read in class or story time, I struggled because I had such a positive reaction to it. Some African American people have embraced the term nappy and might respond very positively to this book. Others are reminded of the history of the term, which is not positive. Having thought about this, I still give this book 5 stars according to my reaction, which is what my Goodreads is about. My opinion. I don't know if I'd use this book at story time or in the classroom, as I recognize that some may find it offensive, but I personally feel that this book is part of the effort to reclaim the term nappy in a positive way and to celebrate the beauty of natural African hair.

  • Aliza
    2018-10-28 22:23

    I had heard of this book for ages. I was ready to be offended. No one's ever called my hair nappy and meant it as a compliment but this book turns hair that naps up "five, six, seven, maybe eight complete circles per inch" into an act of G-d. Into a miracle. Into a thing of beauty."One nap of her hair is the only perfect circle in nature." Will this book make the word nappy PC? Will white folk be able to get away with saying "Girl, you got some awesome nappy hair" after reading this? Probably not. But man, I wish this book had been around for a cute little not-so-brown baby girl with a head full of perfect kinks and perfect circles that I was told were imperfect, am still told are imperfect...except when my hair is SUPER shiny and soaking wet (silly, crazy folks can't even tell!). This book says hair height, hair spirals, hair beauty may not be what you find in your Pantene commercials but if you're lucky enough to be blessed with some nappy hair, it's G-d's gift to you and that's why anyone who doesn't have it is dying to pet it (hands off!), pull it (hands off!) because it is an amazing thing because "G-d wanted hisself some nappy hair upon the face of the earth."Lovely.

  • Baylee Washburn
    2018-11-09 02:22

    The cultural influence in this story by Carolivia Herron is evident in the topic and language used to tell the story. This story of a young girl’s nappy hair is told by Uncle Mordecai with interjections made by the members of the audience. The language of this story and the way that other voices interject short phrases as the story is told seems to reflect characteristics of the African American culture. For example, Uncle Mordecai uses the word “chile” instead of child. This reflects the dialect used by many African Americans. The comments made by members of the audience throughout the story are important as well. It seems that a variety of fonts and sizes of text were used to indicate different speakers from the audience. This seems to be reflective of the way that African American people tell stories and cry out to show their agreement or support for what is being said. Furthermore, the topic of nappy hair is unique to African Americans. It is interesting to see how the entire story revolves around this feature of a young girl’s hair. As the story concludes, the influence of culture on this story is made clearer as a sense of pride in the people’s cultural heritage emerges.

  • Cara Byrne
    2018-10-22 01:13

    "So, God turn hisself around, look them angels square in the face [...] And God, say 'Get outta my way." [...] He say, 'This is my world.' [...] 'This is my world, and this chile.' [...] 'This sweet little brown baby girl child.' [...] 'She's going to have the nappiest hair in the world'" Herron's lively picture book about the history and folklore behind a young girl's dense, uncontrollable hair, as told by the girl's uncle at a family party is a sweet, exciting work that would be fun to read aloud with a group of children speaking the italicized family commentary. The use of folk tales and call and response add to the excitement of the story, making it a stand out as a unique picture book for children. It makes you feel like you have joined this loving family's family reunion and are listening along as Uncle Mordecai's empowers young Brenda. I'm typically not often a fan of Joe Cepeda's illustrations, as I find them overly cartoonish and lacking visual and symbolic depth, but they are a perfect fit with Herron's text. What a lovely work!

  • Ms. McCall
    2018-11-01 00:28

    One thing I find really great about Nappy Hair that may be a drawback to other readers is the presence of God, and the idea that God gave our protagonist her knotty, wild hair with the intention of going against the grain and altering his original concept of beauty. The back-and-forth dialogue and varying font formats that keep the voice true to the original folk tale will make this book a fun read-aloud in the classroom and at home. I can see where controversy may arise, particularly in the many mentions of “brown” girl and Africa, and the setting taking place during the slave era. The illustrations are bold and vibrant and the depiction of Nappy Hair girl with very dark skin is a departure form the norm, or the “light skinned” African American child. The message, that Nappy Hair girl doesn’t alter herself nor her hair to fit in, is sweet, but may be hidden beneath too many cultural flaws for many librarians’ liking.

  • Vicki Kier
    2018-10-21 21:05

    PreS-Gr 3—At a backyard picnic, a small girl named Brenda is teased for her nappy hair. Her uncle leads family and friends in a traditional call-and-response. Their voices, visually differentiated by different font styles and sizes, are undeniably African-American in dialect. Their dialogue celebrates her for her hair, her intelligence, and her uniqueness as a child of God with proud African roots, all of which are beautifully accompanied by Cepeda’s vibrantly colored illustrations. The illustrations and dialogue lack, however, a purpose for the teasing. Brenda has no voice of her own, yet she smiles throughout. Perhaps little girls struggling with self-acceptance will find a more satisfying, gentler message elsewhere. Readers are encouraged to consider worthy alternatives in texts such as Natasha Anastasia Tarpley’s I Love My Hair! (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2001) and Happy to Be Nappy by bell hooks (Jump At The Sun, 1999).

  • Andy Kavanaugh
    2018-11-11 23:19

    The title of this book is Nappy Hair and is written by Carolivia Herron and illustrated by Joe Cepeda. This is the book I chose for my banned/challenged book. I thought the book was terrible.The book starts off by telling how uncle mordacai told a story and how everyone was listening. The story was told and between each line was some text that did not make sense to me, I couldn't tell if it was what uncle Mordecai said between the story or if it was what the people listening were saying. I couldn't really follow the whole story but the whole story basically talked about a little african american girl who had, "the nappiest" hair around. This is why I believe the book is banned/challenged because, to me, this is a derogatory statement about african-american's hair. Don Imus, a radio announcer, lost his job last year because he referred to the Rutger's women's basketball team as a bunch of nappy headed girls, which is derogatory toward their heritage.

  • Heather
    2018-11-13 20:06

    Nappy Hair, written by Carolina Herron and illustrated by Joe Cepeda, is not so much a story as much as a conversation happening between the main character's uncle and the rest of her family about her hair. In the beginning, it almost seems as though the uncle is saying negative things about her "nappy" hair, however as the book moves forward, we find that he is actually complimenting her, and her hair, for her uniqueness. There has been some controversy regarding this title, mostly because of the use of the term "nappy" in describing the little girl's hair, however the overall message it to be proud of the way you are the the unique characteristics that make you you. There have been reports of a school teacher having to leave her position over the reading of this book, however I think that this book should be permitted in the classroom as long there is discussion within the class to contextualize the the contents.

  • Jennifer Danko
    2018-10-18 22:30

    Multicultural education is crucial in today’s classrooms. Not only because America is a diverse country, but because it is important for students to understand and respect other cultures and backgrounds. Carolivia Herron introduces African American culture to classrooms with the book Nappy Hair. Since it is hard to find good children’s books highlighting the African American culture, it is important emphasize importance of diversity as much as possible. Joe Cepeda illustrated the book with a profound use of colors and truth. The African American culture is uplifted and celebrated through the use of language and pictures. This book is great for elementary school students. The cal and response aspect of the book gets the students involved and keeps their attention. Nappy Hair is great for all multicultural lessons.

  • Kerry (The Roaming Librarian) O'Donnell
    2018-11-15 02:32

    I suppose there are different reasons why people might object to this book, whether they don’t like the term “nappy” or the invocation of “God” or something else, I really appreciate that this book is a statement of pride from a little girl, pride over what makes her stand out in this crowd. It was a little strange for me reading it, trying to follow the rhythm of the story, with the intercutting lines from the other adults, and I think this book would be better read aloud (with practice). I thought the illustrations were bright and cheerful and went well with the tone of the story. I would want this in my library because it is such a positive statement, and I think again, that kids need to be exposed to different lifestyles, and ideas about what is normal, what is beautiful. This is an excellent book in that regard.

  • Garren
    2018-11-08 02:30

    I had read about the controversy of parents trying to ban this for being racist, so of course I had to check it out for myself. Not only is it overwhelmingly affirming of natural hairstyle in a funny way, but the grandfather's story is inter-spliced with comments from the rest of the family. It's like the kind of preaching that gets "Preach it, brother!" and "Ain't it true?" shouted out frequently. Considering how a large part of it was a story about God wanting a curly haired brown girl against the objection of angels, it fits well. The art is also bold and spirits-lifting, showing the girl having fun in everyday life. I read it aloud to my partner in a coffee shop and had a lot of fun doing so!