Read the origin and evolution of earth from the big bang to the future of human existence by Robert M. Hazen Online

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This course chronicles the history of Earth and life on Earth from the point of view of the minerals that made it all happen. A major theme is how minerals and life coevolved, leading to the unprecedented mineral diversity on our world compared to the other planets in the solar system. Professor Hazen tells this epic story in 48 action-packed lectures that take you from thThis course chronicles the history of Earth and life on Earth from the point of view of the minerals that made it all happen. A major theme is how minerals and life coevolved, leading to the unprecedented mineral diversity on our world compared to the other planets in the solar system. Professor Hazen tells this epic story in 48 action-packed lectures that take you from the big bang to the formation of the solar system to the major milestones that marked the evolution of Earth and life. He also looks ahead at what to expect millions to billions of years in the future.It's easy to think that the green Earth dominated by life that we experience today is just as it's always been. But Professor Hazen introduces you to a succession of starkly different Earths, starting with the black, basalt-covered planet of 4.5 billion years ago, and progressing through blue, gray, red, and white phases as Earth, minerals, and life developed in concert.Major episodes covered in these lectures include the formation of the moon from the collision of a Mars-sized body with the early Earth; the Great Oxidation Event, which was sparked by the earliest photosynthetic life and is responsible for Earth's iron and other important mineral deposits; the formation of the first continents; the start of plate tectonics more than 3 billion years ago; the repeating cycles of supercontinent formation; the Cambrian explosion of life, resulting in the first animal shells, bones, and teeth; the great episodes of mass extinction, including the dinosaurs; and the rise of humans - along with much else.Most impressively, Professor Hazen is a pioneer in the study of mineral evolution, which is a unique lens through which to view the development of Earth. He tells the story with authority and with a rare gift for making you see the world in a new, intriguing way....

Title : the origin and evolution of earth from the big bang to the future of human existence
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 18923563
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 640 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

the origin and evolution of earth from the big bang to the future of human existence Reviews

  • Nilesh
    2019-05-28 03:56

    For someone who has read scores of books on cosmology, astronomy, evolution and quantum/relativity sciences, iI would have thought it impossible to come across something so refreshingly new on a critically important subject matter. This lecture series is far different and new knowledge-packing than anything I have read or listened to in years.Two evolutions are well covered - the cosmic story from the big bang to our planet and a separate Darwinian story of life on earth. This book sheds some new lights on those two topics but the real subject are all the particles here and now (not atoms, quarks or light particles) that come together and diverge to create various cycles on earth. While the subject of earth evolution is possibly only mildly new, the tools used allow the course to talk about everything in an astoundingly new manner.As we all have been conditioned never to forget, all minerals or even particles on our planet are star dusts in a way. The book traverses paths of these minerals from the formation of hydrogen at the Big Bang to now. In Somewhat new and one of the more interesting parts of these particles' journey from the time when they have been tagged to being a part of the solar cloud is possibly in their coming together as clunks to form astroids, meteors or planets including earth. Cosmology books - compared to the discussions here - clearly do not pay sufficient attention to this.The more interesting part is when the lectures talk about changes in earth - and evolution of all the minerals here on earth from the simple group of less than one hundred at the beginning - in the last 4.5bn years. One is almost forced to give a serious thought to earth being a living, breathing and evolving entity. The last one is definitely true as is made evidently clear in the title of the book!The most interesting part by far - more than anything else - is the coevolution of earth and life. The coevolution that proves how the current atmosphere or earth structure is so deeply linked to the biosphere - almost as much as the way life or biosphere is linked to the atmosphere.For instance, this reviewer had no idea - despite many readings on photosynthesis - that the oxygen we breathe is because of the life formed before and not one of the gases that came along when earth began to exist. The CO2/oxygen cycles since the first days, the cyclical ocean levels and also the cyclical splitting and coming together of earth's land planets contain rich historic information on where/why we are at this juncture of earth's life. The book also shows the role played by life on many of the earth's atmospheric cycles. The conclusions are equally staggering. No matter we do or not do, we are destined to alter our planet the way every other form of life before us has. May be that's why we exist. All species will go extinct and a lot before us have gone extinct because of the changes brought by other species' activities. We are abusing it for sure, but the conclusion that no matter what we do, we can not destroy life ourselves and we cannot prevent its and earth's general journey are still highly heart-warming.A must listen for anyone who is interested in any of the connected sciences.

  • Jim
    2019-06-25 03:32

    This is one of those courses that should be required for every resident of the planet, although I will admit to a wee bit of bias. Dr Hazen clearly, and enthusiastically presents lectures explaining the origins and evolution of the solar system, the elements that comprise it and the minerals that form as a result of those elementary organizations. I am a geologist whose career spanned both the 'hard rock' and 'soft rock' aspects of exploration. My schooling roughly parallels Dr Hazen's...though not extending to basic research. His explanations of the 'origins' came as a stark reminder of either how much I have forgotten from basic (as well as not-so-basic) college geology courses, or how much the study of the earth sciences has progressed in the last 40-odd years. In my graduate-level course work, I was tasked with making those 'thin sections' Dr Hazen refers to...both for igneous and sedimentary rocks (that's a section of Cretaceous rocks from the Eagle Ford formation of south Texas that I attached). Those sections taught me about the evolution of minerals within igneous rocks through the process of differentiation, following strictly the teaching's of N.L. Bowen...as noted in Hazen's bibliography. Long and short of it, this geologist learned a lot from this set of lectures and appreciated hearing the 'multiple working hypothesis' approach from a world-class geologic professional. This course is even worth the full price! (Although, on sale with a coupon is what the data suggest.)

  • Paul
    2019-05-30 22:43

    Huge. Took me three months, though I took several breaks. The lectures are surprisingly exciting, but there's so much here that it would be better to be sitting down taking notes.

  • Roger
    2019-06-05 23:46

    Brilliant!

  • Jeffrey
    2019-06-04 05:44

    While lost at first in new mineralogical terminology, ultimately his passion and the amazing new learnings really made this a bit of a thrill ride for me.

  • Barron
    2019-06-11 03:40

    I really did enjoy this course even though much of it went over my head. There was PDF that went with it, but I didn't discover it until I was almost through with the course. Still, I did learn something from it, so it wasn't a complete loss. Perhaps if I should deign to listen to it again in the future I can use the PDF and maybe get more out of it.

  • Silas
    2019-05-27 04:51

    This was a very interesting series of lectures about the history of the Earth, all the way back to the Big Bang. There are some interesting insights both about the origins of minerals and the interactions between geologic processes and biological evolution. The overview was thorough and the connections between disciplines of science was quite interesting. I liked that the lectures incorporated physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology, and geology into a cohesive narrative, and I feel like I learned a lot from this series of talks.

  • Henry Kline
    2019-06-23 22:55

    very good and different History of Earth through minerals and geology.

  • Corey Ferguson
    2019-06-14 00:33

    I wasn't expecting so much detail on minerals and their composition. Too much information for a layman like myself. I might have given this a higher rating of the book were shorter. I likely won't finish it (giving up about half way).

  • Kyron Mcallister
    2019-05-29 02:51

    An exhausting but excellent overview of, well, pretty much everything.

  • Melanie
    2019-06-19 05:50

    Link to the review on my blog:http://vampireplacebo.wordpress.com/2...

  • David
    2019-06-19 06:51

    Amazing journey throughout the lifespan of he universe!