Read Questioning Your Way to Faith: Learning to Disagree Without Being Disagreeable by Peter Kazmaier Online

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Questioning Your Way to Faith explores some of the most difficult and polarizing questions facing our world today. The setting is the fictional campus of the University of Halcyon-before the cataclysmic event described in the novel, The Halcyon Dislocation. Readers trace the arguments as two friends-each possessing a radically different worldview and philosophy-talk with cQuestioning Your Way to Faith explores some of the most difficult and polarizing questions facing our world today. The setting is the fictional campus of the University of Halcyon-before the cataclysmic event described in the novel, The Halcyon Dislocation. Readers trace the arguments as two friends-each possessing a radically different worldview and philosophy-talk with candor, lucidity, and humor about their disagreements on life's biggest questions. As they discuss such issues as the origins of evil, morality, what it means to be human, and whether the supernatural is possible, their dialogue models the kind of respectful, thoughtful discussion that allows people to disagree without being disagreeable. No matter which side of these questions readers find themselves on, the book explores ideas sure to provoke new insights and understanding....

Title : Questioning Your Way to Faith: Learning to Disagree Without Being Disagreeable
Author :
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ISBN : 9781770699649
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 136 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Questioning Your Way to Faith: Learning to Disagree Without Being Disagreeable Reviews

  • David
    2019-05-20 19:20

    Peter Kazmaier's first book was a gripping novel, The Halcyon Disclocation, that combined science fiction and fantasy with a bit of religion and philosophy thrown in. I believe I referred to this book as Lewis-esque in my review a few months back. When I saw that Peter was releasing another book, I thought it would be the sequel. At first I was a bit disappointed, until I realized the sort of book it was.One reason someone like CS Lewis was so successful as a Christian apologist was because he wrote great novels as well as good reflections on Christian life, theology and apologetics. Lewis was no dry academic. Kazmaier is the same way. He is clearly a smart guy, having been a professor of chemistry for much of his life. His thoughts on science and faith specifically, and Christian apologetics in general, are helpful. But what works best is that he places his apologetic reflections into the Halcyon universe.Questioning Your Way to Faith takes place prior to The Halcyon Dislocation. It is an extended discussion between two characters in the later book, Al and Floyd. Al is supposedly a "nerdy" Christian but he hikes, sails and goes fishing a lot for a stereotypical nerd. Floyd is Al's friend and an atheist. But Floyd is having a crisis of faith (or non-faith) as he discovered his recently deceased grandmother was, despite her intelligence, a Christian. Floyd approaches Al to ask how smart people can be Christians. From then on their discussion covers a lot of typical apologetic topics - problem of evil, existence of god, science and faith.The best value in this book is its real-life setting. Many apologetic books I have read are interesting...to people who read apologetics books. But when you actually talk to people in the real world, the text book answer is not always sufficient. People don't always need or want a point-by-point case for Christianity. Like Floyd, people have specific questions which require specific answers. Sometimes these answers may line up with the standard apologetics book, but not always. The real world, as Al and Floyd discover in their adventures in Halcyon, is a topsy-turvy place!Overall, I recommend this book for all people interested in the big questions of life. We need more writers like Peter who can give us both good stories as well as profound theological and philosophical insights.

  • Lee Harmon
    2019-05-16 00:08

    Al, a nerdy chemist, and Floyd, an atheist jock, share a friendly and respectful conversation about God as they enjoy the wilderness together. Along the way, they discuss moral purpose, evolution (Al is a proponent of intelligent design), the problem of evil, neurochemistry, and causality. The discussion of Kalam’s Argument, which posits that a infinite regression of causes cannot satisfactorily explain today’s existence, is presented with clarity—that’s perhaps the best part of the book for me. You may have to be another nerd to understand the math for that discussion, simple as it is, but don’t worry: this is the only place in the book where you’ll find mathematical symbols. The truth is—and this is the real value of Peter’s book, and the reason I recommend it—Kazmaier has a way of explaining things in simple, comparative terms so that they sink in.The title of the book invokes the question of whether or not “questioning faith” is an oxymoron. Al, the nerdy chemist, insists that he came by faith through questioning, and Floyd insists that faith is a blind (and rather inexcusable) state of refusing to question.A group of us are discussing this book in an apologetics forum, but the truth is, I’m not sure I classify the book as apologetic, simply because of its too-friendly tone. Kazmaier seems more focused on defending the reasonableness of theism than proving the existence of a particular God. His goal seems to be to help atheists agreeably disagree with theists. That may simply be Kazmaier’s nonaggressive style rising to the surface, but it seems appropriate to me. This book does what is possible, presenting the logic for believing in a creator of sorts, and then in the final pages bringing up personal experience to seal the deal. It is Al’s “concrete experiences with the Lord Jesus Christ” that convince him that Christianity is the proper choice among theistic options.Fun book, all the way through. But do I actually agree with all of Al’s arguments, or all of Floyd’s? Of course not. Religion has a slippery way of evading conclusions … thank God.

  • Phil
    2019-05-05 22:24

    A quick read that uses candid discussion between two friends as a platform to dissect life, faith, science, and how the three interact. Well worth the read.

  • Peter Kazmaier
    2019-04-30 23:23

  • Peter Kazmaier
    2019-05-02 02:26